About the Organisation

“65% of people living with a learning disability express a desire to work. However, fewer than one in five people with learning difficulties work, and those who do are predominantly part-time and low-paid.

People with learning difficulties continue to have limited opportunities to form and sustain personal relationships, both intimate and friendly. They are far less likely than the general population to marry or have a long-term partner to share their lives with. For many, personal relationships are confined to immediate family, and the high number who live with elderly parents will soon no longer even have that social context. Many, as a result, are lonely.”
(See Re-Thinking Community Care pdf).

Camphill Blair Drummond is a home-from-home environment outside Stirling providing shared community living, meaningful activities and friendship for people with learning disabilities. Camphill Blair Drummond is a community where everyone lives, works and grows together, regardless of age, background, nationality or ability. It is a vibrant environment made up of residents, day students, employees and volunteers who work alongside adults with severe learning difficulties.

In 2009, Social Investment Scotland invested £1million in Camphill Blair Drummond, with the aim of modernising the facilities and increasing capacity so that more people could join the community. Four purpose-built residential homes were completed, along with four workshops with bespoke facilities for woodwork, estate management, arts and crafts and a sensory workshop encompassing a range of stimulating activities.

living-working-growing-together-pink

Kenny’s story

‘When I was asked what difference it has made for Kenny to be able to take part in Camphill Blair Drummond, I had to respond: just looking at him anyone can see what Camphill is doing for him. He is simply radiating happiness!

When he was offered a place at Camphill Blair Drummond, well it was like winning the Lottery. We had found out about it through his Principal Teacher. She visited and told us about it. She thought what was on offer would be perfect for Kenny and she was absolutely right.

What would be the alternatives for Kenny? It’s hard to say. A support worker perhaps, or a day centre in Grangemouth or Bainsford. There really wasn’t much out there for him. We’re so pleased that he’s been able to get a place.’

Kenny’s mum, Bronwen

Rosie’s story

“We are already seeing a real difference in Rosie. We can see that she has become more confident and many of our friends have even commented on how much more mature and independent she is becoming.

We were delighted when Rosie was offered a place. We love the community and residential aspect. The fact that there are so many young people appeals a great deal. It is very suitable for Rosie’s needs and there is simply nothing like it in Glasgow where we live. We are very happy indeed that Rosie has been given this opportunity to be part of the Blair Drummond community”.

Rosie’s mum, Kate

 

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